Acid reflux (GERD)

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NEW TREATMENT ADDED BY A MEMBER
Elevated pillow
Sleep with an elevated pillow.
71% of users reported improvements
1 review
Physical
TRIED
TRYING
How effective is it?
REMOVE ANSWER
completely cured
significant improvement
minor improvement
no difference
worse than before
Helps with prevention
0 (0%)
2 (29%)
3 (43%)
2 (29%)
0 (0%)
ESSENTIAL RESEARCH
The Montreal definition and classification of gastroesophageal reflux disease: a global evidence-based consensus.
Evidence-based global consensus definitions are possible despite differences in terminology and language, prevalence, and manifestations of the disease in different countries. A global consensus definition for GERD may simplify disease management, allow collaborative research, and make studies more generalizable, assisting patients, physicians, and regulatory agencies.
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NEW SYMPTOM ADDED BY A MEMBER
Yes
15
No
1
Regurgitation
94% reported this symptom
Expulsion of food or acid from the stomach.
Sleeping on an incline
I wanted to answer to the below survey significantly improved but don't use a bed pillow, they are to small, roll off. I use a www.RefluxGuard.com it lifts my entire mattress - A game changer.
0REPLY2 YEARS AGO
PROGRESS UPDATE
SYMPTOM
Regurgitation marked as moderate
Burping (Belching) marked as severe
Bloating marked as severe
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0REPLY3 MONTHS AGO
CLINICAL TRIALRecruiting
Indiana University Gastrointestinal Motility Diagnosis Registry
Indianapolis, United States
All genders
Develop a registry (list of patients) with accurate clinical motility diagnosis. This registry will help the doctors to identify the patients with specific disease conditions. It will also help in promoting future research in gastroenterology motility disorders
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0REPLY1 YEAR AGO
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ESSENTIAL RESEARCH
Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux as a risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma.
There is a strong and probably causal relation between gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal adenocarcinoma. The relation between reflux and adenocarcinoma of the gastric cardia is relatively weak.
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ESSENTIAL RESEARCH
Current concepts in the management of Helicobacter pylori infection: the Maastricht III Consensus Report.
The global burden of gastric cancer is considerable but varies geographically. Eradication of H pylori infection has the potential to reduce the risk of gastric cancer development.
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NEW TREATMENT ADDED BY A MEMBER
19 Studies
Ranitidine (zantac, ranitidin)
Decreases stomach acid production.
33% of users reported improvements
1 review
Prescription
OTC
TRIED
TRYING
How effective is it?
REMOVE ANSWER
completely cured
significant improvement
minor improvement
no difference
worse than before
Helps with prevention
0 (0%)
2 (33%)
0 (0%)
3 (50%)
1 (17%)
NEW SYMPTOM ADDED BY A MEMBER
Yes
7
No
6
Hiccups
54% reported this symptom
An involuntary contraction of the diaphragm that may repeat several times per minute.
ESSENTIAL RESEARCH
Prevalence and clinical spectrum of gastroesophageal reflux: a population-based study in Olmsted County, Minnesota.
Symptoms of reflux are common among white men and women who are 25-74 years of age. Heartburn and acid regurgitation are significantly associated with chest pain, dysphagia, dyspepsia, and globus sensation. The percentage of patients reporting complications is low, but the absolute number is probably considerable given the high prevalence of the condition in the community.
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CLINICAL TRIALNot yet recruiting
The Effect of Positional Therapy on Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Prospective Pilot Study
Cleveland, United States
All genders
Gastroesophageal reflux disease related symptoms are reported by 10-20% of the adult population and of those 50-75% report symptoms during sleep time. The prevalence of nocturnal GERD (nGERD) is estimated to be about 25% in general population. nGERD causes sleep fragmentation, difficulty falling asleep, daytime sleepiness, reduced work productivity and decreased quality of life. Additionally, nighttime gastroesophageal reflux has been associated with increased risk of GERD-related complications such as severe erosive esophagitis, peptic stricture, esophageal ulcer, Barrett's esophagus, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux has been noted to be associated with atypical and extra-esophageal manifestations as well as sleep disturbances. Overall, patients with nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux are more likely to develop a more severe form of GERD. The mainstay of treatment of nighttime gastroesophageal reflux is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). However, nighttime heartburn is the most common breakthrough symptom in patients with GERD, who failed PPI treatment. Other important therapies for nighttime GERD include, lifestyle modifications, such as elevating the head of the bed, avoiding eating at least three hours before bedtime, maintaining appropriate sleep hygiene and avoiding the right decubitus position. Elevating the upper torso by raising the head of the bed and avoiding the right-lateral decubitus position have been shown to improve nocturnal symptoms. Several studies have shown that sleeping in the left decubitus position decrease esophageal acid exposure by reducing 13-76% of the reflux episodes. Studies have shown that the right decubitus position increases the rate of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) accompanied by acid reflux, as compared with the left recumbent position. Moreover, maintaining the left lateral recumbent position, reduced by 87% esophageal acid exposure and nocturnal symptoms. LEFT is a novel electronic wearable device that was developed as a sleep position therapy for patients who suffer from nighttime gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. It is simple, noninvasive and low-cost technology which has been developed by Side Sleep Technologies B.V. Singel, Amesterdam, The Netherland. This technology is designed to train patients to sleep on their left side by a gentle vibration signal once it detects that they are sleeping on their back or right side. Thus, this technique may reduce gastroesophageal reflux and thus provides relief of heartburn and regurgitation during sleep time. The purpose of this study is to determine the usefulness of positional therapy, using the LEFT device, as a nonmedical tool to control GERD-related nocturnal symptoms.
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0REPLY1 YEAR AGO
NEW TREATMENT ADDED BY A MEMBER
Avoid citrus foods
Citrus foods are acidic (e.g., tomatoes, lemons, oranges). Don't eat them to reduce reflux.
Waiting for more user ratings
1 review
Home Remedy
TRIED
TRYING
How effective is it?
REMOVE ANSWER
completely cured
significant improvement
minor improvement
no difference
worse than before
Helps with prevention
Waiting for a few more ratings to show results.
PROGRESS UPDATE
SYMPTOM
Regurgitation marked as mild
Burping (Belching) marked as moderate
Bloating marked as minimal
Show 12 more
0REPLY1 YEAR AGO
Acid Reflux in Supine Position
Looking for research or anecdotal experience with reflux only when in supine and relaxed position. Reflux is non-erosive but fluid migrates into trachea and upper lungs when on back. Sleep at approximately 15-20deg for upper body eliminates regurgitation. Baclofen effective for 2-3 hours. Unfortunately a slow release version has not been announced nor do I know if it would be effective in supine position. Spinal traction proved effective at eliminating reflux but only with continuous treatment. I am 100% convinced that interruptions of nerves regulating esophageal sphincter is a factor for some, if not all, with similar symptoms. This was made clear after having undergone open heart surgery for a defective valve. The reflux disappeared for over 2 months during recovery. I believe the unusual translation of the rib cage at the spine introduced some relief to the nerves. Aside from the recovery, it was pure heaven to sleep in a flat position. Anyways, looking for discussion, references to research or referrals to participate in trials.
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0REPLY2 YEARS AGO
ESSENTIAL RESEARCH
Endoscopic assessment of oesophagitis: clinical and functional correlates and further validation of the Los Angeles classification.
Results add further support to previous studies for the clinical utility of the Los Angeles system for endoscopic grading of oesophagitis.
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ESSENTIAL RESEARCH
Long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy and risk of hip fracture.
Long-term PPI therapy, particularly at high doses, is associated with an increased risk of hip fracture.
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ESSENTIAL RESEARCH
Prevalence of Barrett's esophagus in the general population: an endoscopic study.
BE was found in 1.6% of the general Swedish population. Alcohol and smoking were significant risk factors.
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CLINICAL TRIALRecruiting
Endoscopic Bariatric Therapies (EBTs): A Retrospective and Prospective Multicenter Registry
New York, United States
All genders
The purpose of this registry study is to collect data through medical chart review and in patient visits on the efficacy and safety of various Endoscopic Bariatric therapies (EBTs). This is a retrospective and prospective, observational, medical chart review study for at least 6 standard of care visits up to 5 years after a subject consents for study participation.
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0REPLY1 YEAR AGO
ESSENTIAL RESEARCH
Meta-analysis: obesity and the risk for gastroesophageal reflux disease and its complications.
Obesity is associated with a statistically significant increase in the risk for GERD symptoms, erosive esophagitis, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. The risk for these disorders seems to progressively increase with increasing weight.
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ABOUT
Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux, is a long-term condition where stomach contents come back up into the esophagus resulting in either symptoms or complications. Symptoms include the taste of acid in the back of the mouth, heartburn, bad breath, chest pain, vomiting, breathing problems, and wearing away of the teeth. Complications include esophagitis, esophageal strictures, and Barrett's esophagus.Wikipedia
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